Ionic compounds: applications of chemistry to mineralogy by Claude H. Yoder

By Claude H. Yoder

A pragmatic advent to ionic compounds for either mineralogists and chemists, this e-book bridges the 2 disciplines. It explains the basic rules of the constitution and bonding in minerals, and emphasizes the connection of constitution on the atomic point to the symmetry and homes of crystals. it is a nice reference for these attracted to the chemical and crystallographic homes of minerals.

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In order to answer this question we must consider the interaction of each ion with all of the others. To facilitate this, we will number the ions and also assume that + - + - 1 2 3 4 r the distance between each pair of adjacent ions is the same. We will call this distance r. We start with the left-hand ion, number 1. 5 Interactions Between Ions V= 25 kq1q2 r It is repelled by ion number 3 because ions 1 and 3 have the same charge. The magnitude of this repulsion will be less than that of the attraction between 1 and 2 because 3 is farther away (a distance of 2r).

The more the cation distorts the electron density of the anion, the more covalent the compound. In other words, the more the cation pulls electron density into the region between the atoms, the more electron density is available for sharing. Let us consider as an example the bonding in FeO and Fe2O3. First, we imagine that each compound is ionic. ) Thus, FeO is imagined to contain the Fe2+ and O2− ions, whereas Fe2O3 is imagined to contain the Fe3+ and O2− ions. If we want to compare the bonding in the two compounds we must ask which ion—Fe2+ or Fe3+—distorts the electron density of the oxide ion more.

Thus, FeO is imagined to contain the Fe2+ and O2− ions, whereas Fe2O3 is imagined to contain the Fe3+ and O2− ions. If we want to compare the bonding in the two compounds we must ask which ion—Fe2+ or Fe3+—distorts the electron density of the oxide ion more. Q A Which ion—Fe2+ or Fe3+—distorts the electron density of the anion to the greater extent? Fe3+, because of its higher charge and, consequently, its greater attraction for the electron density. Let us look at this idea a little more carefully.

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