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14 Results found for "east coast"

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    As on Our Own East Coast: A Remarkable War-Photograph

    Illustrated London News | Published: 26 Dec 1914 | Issue #3949

    ...it means for women and children to be in a place under- going bombardment, with such bursting shells crashing all over the streets and houses, as at Li6ge, at Rheims, at Antwerp, yet more recently at much-bombarded Ypres- and even, last week, on our own East Coast....
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    The Method by Which a Hundred English Civilians Were Killed on the East Coast: Rapid Firing in a Casemate Battery on a German War-Ship

    Illustrated London News | Published: 26 Dec 1914 | Issue #3949

    ...engaged in rapid firing. The bombardment of the East Coast towns was carried out very rapidly, as the German ships were in a hurry to return. A British Naval officer who saw the firing at Hartlepool said that it was continuous for half an hour. At Scarborough eighty-eight shells were...
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    The Usual German Target! East Coast Places of Worship Hit

    Illustrated London News | Published: 26 Dec 1914 | Issue #3949

    li- WITH WINDOWS A GAPING CLEFT THE BAPTIST CHURCH, WEST IHARTLEPOOL. VANDALISM ! A MADONNA AT ST. MARYS ROMAN CATHOLIC CIURCH, WEST HARTLEPOOL. HIT ON THE ROOF: THE DAMAGE TO THE CHAPEL IN GLADSTONE ROAD SCARBOROUGH. ccordance with their methods elsewhere-at Rheims...
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    The Great War

    Illustrated London News | Published: 26 Dec 1914 | Issue #3949

    r Ii, ii7 l h,, rrlrincii ihat Ih, ii & k be’or’i thie pre-ent . ( I I it Ill- rle %hn , h, il ltiv t p ,king. night to rl biiri h r i1 of iur. tii ii rlth .n]l g i unh] ll...
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    The First of a Series of Villiers Drawings of the Front from the Coast to Verdun

    Illustrated London News | Published: 19 Dec 1914 | Issue #3948

    A GERMAN ARMADA IN MINIATURE IN THE INUNDATIONS ROUND PERVYSE: THE ENEMY’S FFORT TO OCCUPY A POSITION ON DRY LAND. BY ADVANCING ON RAFTS TOWED BY MOTOR-BOATS AND THEN WADING. REPELLED !Y BELGIAN INFANTRY AND FRENCH ARTILLERY. Mr. Frederic Villiers, who, it will be remembered, was...
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    Where We Made "A Vigorous Offensive" Towards Lille: Part of "The Battle of Ypres Armentières"

    Illustrated London News | Published: 19 Dec 1914 | Issue #3948

    ...Radinghem–La Vall6e-Ennetires-Cap.nghem-Premesque-Railway Line 300 yards east of Halte. . . The Corps’ reserve was at Armentieres Station.” Later, Sir John writes: ” Shortly after daylight on the 3oth another attack began to develop in the direction of Zandvoorde, supported by heavy artillery fire. . Sir Douglas Haig describes the position...
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    German Havoc in English Homes: A Scarborough House Wrecked

    Illustrated London News | Published: 26 Dec 1914 | Issue #3949

    ...the three East Coast towns were taken by surprise by the German bombardment. At Scarborough several people were killed in their houses, dressing in their bedrooms, or sitting quietly at breakfast some while beginning their day’s work. Many others were injumed in similar circumstances by the crash ot lallin:: roofs...
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    "Fortified" by Castle Ruins!—Scarborough after Bombardment

    Illustrated London News | Published: 26 Dec 1914 | Issue #3949

    ...STREET, SCARBOROUGH, WRECKED BY A GERMAN SHELL A German official report stated that ” our high sea forces have approached the English East Coast and bombarded the fortified towns, Scarborough and Hartlepool.” Scar- borough’s ‘ fortifications,” presumably, consist of the picturesque ruins of its ancient castle, whose milihtary...
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    The Playhouses

    Illustrated London News | Published: 19 Dec 1914 | Issue #3948

    ...wlich spies take the place of burglars and the archl-dertective’s sub- stitute is a genius of counter-espionage. Even hardened irst-n ighters were hearts’ in their weilcomie of this variant on a utnventiotnal anid almost ha kneydrl form. The East Coast boardling-house, the Engfishi na med pifoprietress of which was the...
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    After Many Years: English Towns Attacked and English People Killed on Their Own Soil by an Enemy

    Illustrated London News | Published: 26 Dec 1914 | Issue #3949

    ...GERMAN SHELL AT SCARBOROUGH. many years-more than a century, in fact-since an enemy’s force had attacked the British coast. The last occasion was the sma t tme that Scarborough was attacked from the sea was in the year of William the Conqueror’s invasion of England, o66, when .oyed...
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    Warring Elements: Driving the Germans Eastward from Ypres in Rain and Mist

    Illustrated London News | Published: 26 Dec 1914 | Issue #3949

    ...the road to Cala:s. Not only, however, have the Germans entirely failed to capture Ypres, but step by step they have been steadily dr:ven back towards the north and east by a succession of dashing bayonet-fights, mostly carried out after dark. One night one of the German trenches would be...
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    Science & Natural History

    Illustrated London News | Published: 26 Dec 1914 | Issue #3949

    ...Western India, belong to the Indo- Afghan race, but they are mixed with Jats and Hindus on the east and Arabs on the south. The Afridis, of the Khyber Pass, are racially Afghans, and hence is explained their splendid fight- ing qualities, for between them and the Baluchis there are...
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    The Great War

    Illustrated London News | Published: 19 Dec 1914 | Issue #3948

    ý11 ;i/ I .I L ýý ) 0N Nov. I two of our cruisers, the Good Hope and Monmouth, were sunk off the coast of Chile by a German squadron under Admiral Count von Spec (pronounced ” Spay “), and on Dec. 8 following four of the...
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    Books on War and Art

    Illustrated London News | Published: 19 Dec 1914 | Issue #3948

    ...theme of tertam excellent tales. The West Country coast-towns knew himi well a hlundlredl years ago-better, perhaps, than any othler part of tihe kingiuoi, and the most picturesque of all the captives was, possibly, Rochambeau. It is, therefoire, rather plh(uant that we should now receive from the edlitorial landl of...